How To Grow Baltic Blue Pothos? (The Ultimate Guide For Epipremnum pinnatum Baltic Blue)

by Molly Heather
How to grow Baltic Blue Pothos https://organicgardeningeek.com

If you are a fan of indoor plants that mature quickly and need little attention, this particular pothos variety is an absolute must. Both the Baltic Blue Pothos (Epipremnum pinnatum) and Cebu Blue Pothos have comparable characteristics. However, the Cebu Blue Pothos has leaves that are a somewhat lighter shade of green and grow fenestrations, also known as lobes, on its leaves much later than these.

In this post, you will find all the details on how to grow Baltic blue pothos, how to care for them, and more.

How To Grow Baltic Blue Pothos

This indoor vine requires very little maintenance; just water it when the soil becomes dry and place it in a brightly lighted area that receives indirect sunlight. When you see the appearance of new leaves on this fast-growing plant, it is imperative that you promptly apply fertilizer.

You might try staking your Epipremnum pinnatum in the hope that it would assist the leaves in developing lobes and growing in size. If consumed, this plant will cause severe illness. Keep a safe distance from both animals and children. Additionally, it has the potential to irritate the skin.

Baltic Blue Pothos grow and care guide https://organicgardeningeek.com
Baltic Blue Pothos

Pothos Baltic Blue Plant Characteristics

The Baltic Pothos is a pothos plant with broad, emerald-colored leaves. As the leaves age, they take on a bluish cast, which is most noticeable in the autumn and winter months.

The fact that the leaves of this plant swiftly grow fenestrations, which are splits in the leaf, might be the most fantastic feature of this plant. In contrast to the “window” type fenestrations of the Swiss cheese plant, these fenestrations are more like cracks in the leaf.

In addition to the fact that it is very hard to kill pothos plants, one of the most incredible things about them is that they come in such a wide variety of subspecies and that they develop very quickly. The pothos plant is an excellent choice for you if you want to create the feel of a lush tropical forest in a room with low light levels. Seriously.

Soil requirements

Baltic Blue Pothos soil requirements https://organicgardeningeek.com

The Epipremnum Baltic Blue does best when grown in potting soil that may be purchased commercially. Because the roots of this plant are like a generally dry climate, you should choose components of the soil with the proper moisture retention qualities. You may make your own soil combination by combining peat moss, perlite, and coco coir.

Root rot and other diseases may be avoided by ensuring enough drainage. To improve the aeration of your soil, you may want to consider putting coarse and granular material into it.

Light requirements

The Baltic Blue Pothos is able to flourish in a variety of light environments. It thrives in conditions ranging from medium to high light, ideally. (During most of the day, this kind of light casts a shadow that is somewhere from moderate to significant.)

The leaves will become green rather than blue when exposed to too intense light. Our Plant Hunter recommends cultivating it no farther than three to four feet away from an unobstructed east- or west-facing window, where it will get a light intensity of at least sixty footcandles.

On the other hand, if you put this plant in a window that faces north, it should flourish well.

You should be aware of how much light is coming in if you put it in a window that faces east because it will be very bright.

The location may be suitable in the autumn, spring, and winter months, but during the summer months, even being indoors may be uncomfortable due to the sun’s intensity.

Because exposure to direct light can cause damage to plant foliage, it is essential to ensure that you are in the shade whenever you take plants outside during the spring and summer months.

If you have no choice but to place it in an area that is illuminated by direct sunlight, the morning hours offer the best lighting conditions for doing so.

You shouldn’t miss this video to learn about Baltic blue pothos care:

How To Grow Baltic Blue Pothos

Growing Baltic Blue Pothos is a simple and enjoyable process. If you want to develop a broader growth habit or recycle stem cuttings from previous pruning, propagation is an excellent option. As a result of the difficulty in acquiring these plants, propagation is an excellent method for creating new plants that may be given to family, friends, or other people who have a passion for plants.

There are two different ways to propagate Baltic blue pothos: In Sphagnum moss or water.

Growing in water

Growing Baltic Blue Pothos in water https://organicgardeningeek.com

Make sure your pruning shears or scissors are sharp before you attempt to take cuttings from your plant. Check that each stem cutting has at least five to six leaves before using it.

Take off two or three of the lowest leaves the new cuttings so you can see the nodes farther up the stem.

Put the cuttings of the stem in water, being sure to submerge any exposed nodes while allowing the remaining leaves to stay above the surface.

Every week, the water should be replaced in order to maintain its quality. In around two to three weeks, the roots should start to develop.

After the roots on the cuttings have grown to a length of at least one to two inches, they may be planted in soil.

Put the potting mix in a tiny pot with good drainage, and then add a little water to the soil.

Place the cuttings that have taken root in the container, and then set the container in an area that is exposed to indirect light that ranges from mild to bright. After allowing the roots to adjust for one to two weeks by maintaining an equal moisture level in the soil, you should then go back to your typical watering routine.

In around two weeks, you should start noticing the roots’ development. Before putting the plants into the soil, it’s best to let them root for approximately two months or until their roots are about one to three inches in length.

Growing in sphagnum moss

Growing Baltic Blue Pothos in sphagnum moss https://organicgardeningeek.com
  • Put your sphagnum moss in a basin and cover it with water. Let it soak for ten to fifteen minutes before you begin.
  • During the time that the moss is soaking, you should use a pair of sharp pruning shears or scissors to remove cuttings off your plant. Check that each stem cutting has at least five to six leaves before using it.
  • Take two or three of the lowest leaves off of the new cuttings so that you can see the nodes farther up the stem.
  • After the water from the sphagnum moss has been drained and the moss has been squeezed to remove any remaining moisture, put the moss in a small container or pot (clear plastic pots are great for this).
  • When inserting the new cuttings into the sphagnum moss, take care to ensure that the moss completely covers any exposed nodes but that the leaves of the cuttings remain open to the air.
  • If you want to assist boost the humidity surrounding the moss, cover the pot or container with a plastic bag that can be sealed back up again, but make sure the leaves are not contained inside the bag.
  • By spraying the moss once per week, you may ensure that it remains uniformly damp (but not soaked). After around two to three weeks, the roots should start to develop. Resist the temptation to check on the roots too soon in order to keep from doing any damage to them.
  • After the roots have grown to a length of at least one to two inches, you may start inserting the cuttings into the soil. Remove the cuttings from the sphagnum moss in a careful manner. Because the roots are so sensitive, you shouldn’t worry too much about pulling any moss off that could be attached to them. Any moss that is still there after the new soil mixture has been created will be incorporated into it.
  • Put the potting mix in a tiny pot that has good drainage, and then add a little bit of water to the soil.
  • Place the cuttings that have taken root in the container, and then set the container in an area that is exposed to indirect light that ranges from mild to bright.
  • After allowing the roots to adjust for one to two weeks by maintaining an equal moisture level in the soil, you should then go back to your typical watering routine.

Fertilizing

Fertilizing is a crucial step for baltic blue pothos care. In the same way as other houseplants, the Baltic Blue pothos thrives when fed twice annually or more often every six months. Utilize a fertilizer explicitly designed for houseplants or plants kept in containers.

Always be sure to follow the instructions provided in the product’s box. If you want your plant to develop at a quicker rate, you should fertilize it more often. Never apply more fertilizer (either in terms of amount or frequency) than what is recommended on the product’s container. This goes for both the quantity and the frequency of application.

Pruning

Baltic Blue pothos starts to develop into a vine as it ages, and it is possible to show it as a hanging plant or to train it to climb up a peat post. If you want to preserve your Baltic Blue pothos in a more compact form, just pinch back any new growth as it appears. This will encourage the plant to branch out and become denser. At any point throughout the year, you don’t have to worry about the plant being harmed if you pinch or clip it.

Repotting

The roots of your Baltic Blue Pothos will have more space to expand if you repot it into a bigger container. When it is time to repot a plant, you will often see roots sprouting through the drainage holes in the existing container.

In general, tropical plants need to have their pots changed around once per year. It is highly recommended that, before filling the new pot, the old, nutrient-deficient soil be removed and replaced with a fresh batch of ordinary commercial potting soil.

Humidity & Temperature Requirements

Temperatures in the home ranging from 60 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit are ideal for the growth of all types of pothos, including the Baltic Blue Pothos. If you reside in an area with a moderate climate and want to keep your pothos outdoors, you shouldn’t do so if the temperature drops below 55 degrees Fahrenheit. Pothos are tropical plants that do not grow well when exposed to temperatures below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Baltic Blue Pothos Pest and Diseases

It would be best if you were on the lookout for common pests that might infest houseplants since Baltic Blue Pothos is vulnerable to getting them.

Mealybugs and scale are two types of sap-feeding pests that, over time, may cause harm to the plant’s leaves. They both leave behind a sticky residue on the leaves and stem of a plant, which is one of the first indicators that you are dealing with an infestation of some kind.

Pothos plants are known to attract fungus gnats because of the damp soil that they grow in, which is another frequent insect that attacks houseplants. These flying pests deposit their eggs in the ground, and the larvae that hatch from those eggs feed on the plant’s root system.

Baltic Blue Pothos – FAQ

Are Cebu blue and Baltic blue The Same?

Baltic Blue Pothos is closely linked to Cebu Blue Pothos (Epipremnum pinnatum ‘Cebu Blue’) despite being a separate species. Darker and earlier-fenestrating leaves are characteristic of Baltic Blue. The flora in Cebu Blue has a significantly more pronounced silvery blue hue.

Do Baltic blue pothos climb?

Like all other varieties of pothos, the Baltic blue pothos is a vining epiphyte that naturally climbs trees and other big plants in its natural habitat. It is possible to cultivate young Baltic blue pothos effectively in hanging pots, but mature plants are aggressive climbers and need support from a pole or trellis in order to survive.

Why is it called Baltic blue pothos?

The Baltic Pothos is a kind of pothos plant that has broad, emerald-colored leaves. As the leaves age, they take on a bluish cast, which is most noticeable in the autumn and winter months.

Why does my Baltic blue pothos have yellow leaves?

Yellow leaves may be caused by a variety of various issues, ranging from an excess of light to being underwatered to a deficiency in humidity in the air. It is important to do an analysis of the specific growth conditions of your plant in order to determine the underlying reason for the yellowing of the leaves.

What temp can pothos tolerate?

Maintaining this plant at temperatures ranging from 60 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit (15 to 29 degrees Celsius) throughout the year will ensure that it remains in the best possible health. It can survive brief exposure to temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius), but temperatures lower than that will kill the plant.

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